Tag Archives: BBQ

We are NOT BBQ-Pro Grill, we are The BBQ Pro Shop

From time to time, we get calls, and emails letting us know about the problems that people are having with BBQ-Pro grills, either looking for spare parts or fielding general complaints. BBQ Pro Shop is not affiliated in anyway with BBQ-Pro grills.

We are not a BBQ-Pro Grill Shop, we are THE BBQ Pro Shop and we’ve got plenty of smokers and grills as well as tools and accessories. We often tell people that they should either contact the place where they bought the grill and speak to them directly. We recommend that you do your best and purchase a high quality grill or smoker whenever possible. Primo Charcoal or Wood Burning Grills and Smokers as well as the Minden Grill Company for Gas Grills are a couple of our favorites.

Liquid Smoke: Cheat or Style?

I want to start by saying that I feel like I am a purist, when I BBQ, I use real wood on my Primo XL Grill and I cook low and slow. When I grill on my gas grills, I use all natural ingredients and never use the smoker box. I am fortunate though, I have a big backyard, a deck, a Weber Kettle, two Weber Summit Gas Grills, and two Weber Smokey Joes. For those people that live in big cities without a deck or outdoor cooking space, the indoor Cameron Stovetop Smoker and the crock pot or broiler are all they have! So is using a BBQ method other than a grill or smoker cheating? I would think not.

A friend of mine opened my eyes to the magic of liquid smoke and although I prefer using a grill, I thought that this information could be useful to those people out there who may not know that liquid smoke is one of the best kept secrets out there. My good friend Jill one time told me that she made incredible pulled pork in her crock pot and I of course thought it would be a cheating in the highest form! I recently smoked pork butts for 16 hours and they were fantastic, how can a crock pot replicate that?

Thank you Heff for sending me this post called The Secret of Liquid Smoke that explains the science of liquid smoke and has a recipe for what they call “Ultimate Cheater Pulled Pork“. ¬†After reading the comments and the reviews on the article, it has opened my mind to the fact that BBQ is what you make it, and whether that is in your oven broiler, steamer or crock pot, you stick with it. Here are some of the Q&A from the article on Liquid Smoke, you can file this under “Bet you didn’t know…”

You can be forgiven for wrongfully accusing liquid smoke of nefarious fakey toxic chemicalness. Even chemists have been confused on this one. Back in June, Slashfood interviewed NYU chemistry professorKent Kirshenbaum, who–like you, me, Lynne Rossetto Kasper and everyone we know–had believed the worst about this cheap, sketchy sounding liquid.

Unlike the rest of us, however, Kirshenbaum actually went out and studied liquid smoke. He found that, despite its synthetic 1950′s aura, the stuff is perfectly natural.

What is liquid smoke?
Liquid smoke is very simply smoke in water. Smoke usually comes as a vapor, but there are ways to condense it and turn it into liquid and that liquid can then be carried in water.

How is it different from regular smoke?
Regular smoke is a vapor, and it is difficult to store.

Is one healthier than the other?
It seems that the liquid smoke can be substantially healthier because there are carcinogenic compounds that can be removed. A lot of the carcinogenic compounds [found in direct smoke from charcoal or wood] do not dissolve. But by dissolving the compounds into water, they can be removed.

So, it’s like a water bong?
Correct.

So let me know what your “unorthodox” BBQ secrets are and how they worked. My first taste of “sublime” babybacks came from Jackie Shodo, a wonderful woman who used to stay with us when my parents went out of town. She made some fall off the bone ribs using maple syrup, brown sugar and the oven, so who am I to judge?

Myron Mixon – BBQ Pitmaster with Style!

Myron MIxon -  Jack's Old SouthOk, so I tuned into the first episode of BBQ Pit Masters on TLC and I must say that although it has hints of being overly dramatized, overall it was very entertaining and I loved the suspense of the awards ceremony and all the trials and tribulations of the various pitmasters. They had a great slice of total rookies, to great competitors all the way down to the team from California who were competing in a tourney with a couple of Weber Smokey Joes! Although I have never competed in a KCBS event, I have done a small local tournament once and found that the key ingredient to it all is this fellowship and friendly competition that surrounds an event like this.

There was quite a bit of chest thumping as well as a whole mess of ego in this first episode which was a little disturbing as I had hoped that they would capture the ying and yang of that love of BBQ and competition and not who was the best. But heck, with $10,000 at stake for the Grand Champion I suppose that for some, this is business and pride mixed in with the thrill of the competition.

I was totally mesmerized by Myron Mixon, of Jack’s Old South, who had more beeping in his private interviews and a style all his own! First off, loved his custom made grills, if anyone know whether he makes his own, would love to know. His style was the think that just dropped my jaw and let’s face it, he won the tournament so he BBQ’s to win and I just love that. First of, cooking on brickets with lighter fluid, and not just a squirt, I am talking lighter fluid! Johnny Triggs expressions were priceless and the fact that it did effect the flavor of the food, is a testament to his style.

Thought that this episode was a lot of fun and I look forward to watching some more. My hope is that rather than following the same people for tournament after tournament that they will spread their focus. There are just so many styles out there and when the end result is incredible BBQ, that is the magic of this sport!

NEW TLC SERIES ‘BBQ PITMASTERS’

Finally, Kate and Jon are gone and we can get down to some serious reality TV and enjoy watching the trials and tribulations of some true American competitors, BBQ Pitmasters! TLC will feature this new series and we are proud to find out early that at least one of our featured Pitmasters, Mike Mills will be featured on the show. Here is a brief Synopsis:

Eight one-hour episodes of BBQ PITMASTERS have been ordered, and is scheduled to premiere December 3 on TLC. The series is produced by Original Media.

BBQ PITMASTERS transports viewers to this competitive cooking subculture, where an estimated 10 million people visit each year to get up-close and personal with the leading chefs of America’s burgeoning barbecue circuit. Like an all-star poker tournament or a championship car race, it is at these events that reputations and respect are gained and lost. For pit masters, the honor rides on the virtues of one perfectly charred rib, and hundreds of thousands of dollars trade hands after a single, mouth-watering bite of brisket.

Finally they recognize that BBQ is not just a hobby, but a competitive sport. We cannot wait to see this and encourage you to check out BBQ Pro Shop where you can grill like a pro and use the rubs and sauces perfected and sold by the pitmasters featured on this show.

The Science of BBQing?

I always thought that BBQ was more art than science, and then I started smoking meat as a hobby, low and slow you might say and soon learned about the BBQ Guru, which was where science was introduced into the mix. Low and slow is the way to go when grilling and the more you burn your BBQ, the worse it gets for you from a toxin standpoint. In other words, chemically altering the make up of the meat. Boing Boing featured an article Science of BBQing and after reading it, there is a whole lot going on and making sure that you keep your grilling as healthy as possible, I pulled out a few gems.

Other research-proven tricks for reducing HCAs, as noted in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, include using marinades, garlic and onion, said Risch. A marinade of red wine, for instance, can reduce the formation of HCAs by 88 percent, she noted. Although scientists aren’t sure exactly how these techniques work, moisture from marinades may ensure that the meat directly in contact with the grill remains at a relatively low temperature, she said.

HCA’s in BBQ meat can be bad, and to support the idea of good BBQ grilling practice she made this comment:

The amount of HCAs formed in grilled meats typically triples if meats are cooked well done rather than medium well, she noted.

So we recommend that you do not torch your meat, instead, use low and slow cooking methods as well as indirect cooking which truly changes the way that you can use your grill or smoker. Indirect cooking on the grill means moving the coals to the side of your BBQ grill or turning off some of your gas burners and cooking over the unheated surface.  The BBQ acts as an oven and still cooks the meat but you get a very moist end result in the meat or vegetables. The Grill Friends Grill Mat is an excellent way to cook indirect on the grill.

Also remember that “high” is not the only setting on your grill and that cooking the meat over white hot coals is not the only way to do it. I always cook chicken breasts, especially boneless breasts under medium heat and the end result is always very moist. Burgers can be the same, I usually heat the grill on High and then dial it down to medium for when I actually put the burgers on. All the grease usually flares up and provides enough extra heat that I get golden brown burgers every time.

There is a science to BBQ grilling, and the more you experiment, the better your artistic talents. Let’s face it, there is an art in science too.